IPAM carries out its mission with the assistance and support of many people in a variety of roles.  The IPAM community consists of the directorate, staff, Science Advisory Board, Board of Trustees, and of course, program organizers, speakers, and participants, which are unique to each program. You can read about current members of the directorate and staff below.  Openings for associate director will be posted on this site every two or three years; staff openings are advertised on UCLA Campus Human Resources. The Science Advisory Board approves all scientific programs sponsored by IPAM.  The Board of Trustees approves the budget and plans for the upcoming year. Each board meets once a year and communicates with the Director regularly. Members serve four year terms. IPAM's directors are ex-officio members. The building directory includes all directors, staff and participants of the current long program with offices at IPAM.
Russel Caflisch

Russel Caflisch

Director

Russel Caflisch studied mathematics at Michigan State and NYU’s Courant Institute. He began his teaching career at Stanford, returned to NYU in 1984, then joined the mathematics faculty of UCLA in 1989. He has joint appointments in Materials Science and Engineering. Dr. Caflisch served on IPAM’s Board of Trustees for several years and as an organizer of two IPAM long programs before he was recruited to be IPAM’s Director in 2008. He was an Alfred P. Sloan research fellow and an invited lecturer at the 2006 International Congress of Mathematicians, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, AMS, and SIAM. He was a founding member of California NanoSystems Institute.  His research interests include materials science, mathematical finance, Monte Carlo methods, kinetic theory, plasma dynamics, fluid dynamics, and PDEs.

Jorge Balbás

Jorge Balbás

Associate Director

Jorge Balbás grew up in Madrid, Spain.  He moved to the US in 1992 for professional flight training.  While working as a commercial pilot and flight instructor in Southern California, he obtained a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree in Applied Mathematics at UCLA in 2000, and a PhD in Mathematics in 2004, also at UCLA.  He spent the next three years at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor as a post-doc, and returned to Southern California in 2007 to join the mathematics department at California State University, Northridge, where he is currently an Associate Professor.  Balbás’ research is in Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis.  His work focuses in the development of numerical methods for solving PDEs and the simulation of physical phenomena such as astrophysical flows (e.g., MHD) and shallow-water flows along channels.  He also has an interest in heuristic optimization algorithms for scheduling and timetabling problems.

Stan Osher

Stan Osher

Director of Special Projects

Stan Osher grew up in Brooklyn, New York and obtained his PhD from the Courant Institute at NYU.  After working at Brookhaven National Laboratory, UC Berkeley, and SUNY Stony Brook, he arrived at UCLA in 1976 as a visiting Professor and never left.  Dr. Osher has co-invented and developed: the level set methods for computing moving fronts involving topological changes; essentially nonosillatory high order methods for approximating hyperbolic conservation laws and Hamilton-Jacobi equations; total variation and other partial differential equation based image processing techniques; fast optimization algorithms for L1 based regularization, and diffusion generated geometric motion. Among his many honors, he has given regular (1994) and plenary (2010) invited addresses at the International Congress of Mathematicians and the John von Neumann lecture at the annual SIAM meeting; he is a fellow of SIAM, the AMS, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Christian Ratsch

Christian Ratsch

Associate Director

Christian Ratsch grew up in Berlin, Germany, where he received his undergraduate education at the Technical University. He moved to the United States in 1988, where he completed his PhD in physics at Georgia Tech in 1994. After a short appointment at the Imperial College in London and a two-year post-doc at the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin, Ratsch came to the UCLA Mathematics Department in 1997. He has been at UCLA since then, and joined IPAM as the Associate Director in 2006. Ratsch’s research interests are mathematical and physical modeling and simulation of problems in materials sciences on all appropriate time and length scales.

His expertise includes density-functional theory (DFT), stochastic, atomistic models (KMC), and continuum type models (level-sets). The research topics of his research group include modeling and simulation of growth of thin films and nanostructures, design and optimization of new hybrid solar cells, and design and optimization of new heterocrystals.